Recipes

Curried Squash & Mushroom Soup

Makes enough soup for 10 people

Bake in oven on a greased cookie sheet
1 butternut squash (Split and seeded)
2 yams (halved)
1 acorn squash (Split and seeded)

Sauté in large heavy soup pot in 2 or 3 Tablespoons of oil (Olive or Coconut) for 1 min  (you can also use butter)
1 finely chopped large onion
1 T. curry
1 T. Garam Marsala
1 medium clove garlic crushed
1/2/tsp cinnamon
Then turn down the heat to low and put on the lid and stew the onion in its own juices for 20 minutes.

Then add to the onion
6 carrots chopped up
3 celery chopped up
Steam in onion mixture for 10 more min

Take the cooked squashes and place in blender with water or chicken broth (I use 2 to 3 cups overall)  and blend.  You will have to do this several times to get all the squash blended.  Then add this to the onion/celery mixture.  Add more water or broth as needed to create the thickness you desire.

I also add 1 T. marmite and 2 T. Better than Bouillon Chicken (no msg)
1 tsp salt
optional – some cayenne or lemon juice
Cook further for 1 hour on simmer (the longer you cook the more the flavors meld)

At this point the soup can be refrigerated
Before serving
Take 2 pounds of mushrooms and chop up fairly small and sauté in 3 T. butter.  Then when they are done – add to the soup and serve.  
If you use smaller amount to eat then do smaller amounts of mushrooms.


For those not on the cleanse you can put a dollop of plain yogurt or cream fraiche on top.



BREAD

6 C flour (I use kamut or spelt. If those can't be tolerated, I use a combination of
4 C brown rice flour and 2 C garbanzo bean flour.)
1 T salt
2 T baking powder
1 package stevia powder (or you can use a couple of tablespoons of honey or rice
syrup, etc.)
Mix these together well. A Kitchen Aid blender works perfectly.
 
Add:
1-1/3 C milk (Be creative and use goat milk, rice milk, almond milk or whatever can be tolerated. If none can, just use water.)
1/4 C whey - see below-or use lemon juice or apple cider vinegar
1/4 C olive oil
Approximately 2 to 3 cups of water.
 
Mix well. You want the consistency to be somewhere between pancake batter and muffins. You can experiment to see what you like best.
 
Place in a 9x13 Pyrex baking pan, cover, and let it sit on the counter from 12 to 24 hours before baking. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.
 
Letting the batter stand for 12-24 hours allows it to ferment, making it easier to digest and neutralizing phytic acid, which will otherwise bind with calcium and other minerals in the digestive tract, making them less available to the body. It is necessary to soak the grain in an acid environment, thus the whey, in order for the phytic acid to be neutralized. I am able to use kamut or spelt four times a week as long as I ferment it first; otherwise I need to avoid it completely. So can my daughter, who originally could not tolerate any gluten in any form.
 
The easiest way to make whey is to strain whatever kind of yogurt can be tolerated. Put it in a colander lined with a plain dish towel and then hang it over the colander-with the colander inside a bowl to catch the whey-for 24 hours. You can hang it off of a kitchen cabinet knob. I don't have knobs, so I use a plant hanger I attached above my kitchen counter.
 
You can use the remaining yogurt to make cream cheese, either sweet (we put it on pancakes or toast) or with herbs for a cracker spread.  



PANCAKES

5 C flour, either kamut or spelt
1-1/2 C milk (goat, almond, rice, etc.)
1-1/2 C water
1/4 C whey - see below
1/4 C olive oil
2 tsp. vanilla extract
 
Mix together (a Kitchen Aid blender works well), cover and let ferment all day on the counter.
 
Just before cooking, add:
3 eggs
1 T baking powder
1-1/4 tsp. baking soda
1-1/2 tsp. salt
2 T honey, rice syrup, or pure maple syrup
 
Mix well. Let the griddle get fully heated before adding the batter. Coconut oil works well to grease the griddle between each batch of pancakes.
 
Letting the batter stand for 12-24 hours allows it to ferment, making it easier to digest and neutralizing phytic acid, which will otherwise bind with calcium and other minerals in the digestive tract, making them less available to the body. It is necessary to soak the grain in an acid environment, thus the whey, in order for the phytic acid to be neutralized. I am able to use kamut or spelt four times a week as long as I ferment it first; otherwise I need to avoid it completely. So can my daughter, who originally could not tolerate any gluten in any form.
 
The easiest way to make whey is to strain whatever kind of yogurt can be tolerated. Put it in a colander lined with a plain dish towel and then hang it over the colander-with the colander inside a bowl to catch the whey-for 24 hours. You can hang it off of a kitchen cabinet knob. I don't have knobs, so I use a plant hanger I attached above my kitchen counter.
 
You can use the remaining yogurt to make cream cheese, either sweet (we put it on pancakes or toast) or with herbs for a cracker spread.